Denise Kupferschmidt

Denise Kupferschmidt’s minimal visual vocabulary invokes Primitivism and earlier forms of ancient iconography. Through her simple outlines, which she calls Crude Idols, Denise communicates complex ideas efficiently and instantly. “People tend to project more complicated ideas on simple forms,” she says, making work about fundamental polarities of good and evil, masculinity and femininity. Denise also has a special appreciation of paper, using aged stock from old books for her printmaking, or building totems out of paper cut-outs. Denise is a time-traveller artist, borrowing language tools from Mesopotamia, yet making visual art that functions as instant-messaging.

Claire Milbrath’s Love Letter to a Cardsharp

PUBLISHED IN ISSUE 18 By Claire Milbrath Banished from Rome for murder, Michelangelo Caravaggio packed up everything he owned and boarded a ship sailing far from trouble. The boat took a pit stop on a remote island, and Caravaggio hopped off to stretch his legs. While strolling along the beach, a Spanish garrison officer mistook him…

Artist’s Praise

New video by Claire Milbrath, filmed by Maya Fuhr.

Roscoe: A Brief & Imprecise History of Beefcakes

  TEXT BY CLAIRE MILBRATH PUBLISHED IN ISSUE 17 Staring up at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, there are swarms of male bodies: bulging, complicated, exaggerated muscle. We find chiseled hands gripping rippling biceps, or floating bubble butts thrusting into the faces of other men. Michelangelo’s homoerotic dream would help form our notion of…

Interview with Kari Cholnoky

Kari Cholnoky’s paintings feel toxic and synthetic, yet visceral and sensual…

Interview with Louisa Gagliardi

Louisa Gagliardi’s paintings are celebrated for being like nothing you’ve seen on canvas, which makes sense as she’s a true anti-paint painter. Never actually touching brushes or paint, Gagliardi constructs her work on the screen and prints on PVC, a process somehow fitting for her digitally-tormented figures.

An Interview with Alake Shilling

PUBLISHED IN ISSUE 17 INTERVIEW BY CLAIRE MILBRATH A sad cowboy teddy bear rides his way home from the local watering hole, where a frog naps atop a lily pad and swirly butterflies hide among glittering daisies. We’ve arrived in the psychedelic fable world of Alake Shilling. Alake’s heavily textured works borrow elements of nature…

Tsar of the Week

PUBLISHED IN ISSUE 16 WORDS BY CLAIRE MILBRATH PORTRAIT BY JONNY NEGRON Catherine the Great was rumoured to have killed her own husband, and reportedly traded lovers like cards. She was a German Princess of the 18th century, and a sovereign of Russia for thirty-four years. Her expansion of the Russian Empire was unprecedented. She…

Naive Painters: Essay by Claire Milbrath

PUBLISHED IN ISSUE 15 Henri Rousseau  My favourite genre of art is naive art because it makes me smile. That classification is pretty dated by now, and calling something “primitive” or “naive” is seen as derogatory. But I do think the term “naive” is a good way to describe this type of work. Naive art…